SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER
MARINE LOG MAGAZINESave the dates!
SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER SPACER
AUGUST 2008 ISSUE

BEATING THE PIRATES
What's the best way for a shipowner to avoid having a ship hijacked by pirates?

Reroute the ship even if it means a huge diversion
Stay within recommended safe limits and patrolled areas
Hire an on-board security team
Just hope for the best

October 5, 2008

Fifth Fleet releases photos of Faina hostages

U.S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH

Click on image to enlarge

Putting a human face on the cost of Somali piracy, Fifth Fleet released photos showing the ship's crew of MV Faina standing on the deck following a U.S. Navy request to check on their health and welfare. The photo is dated October 3.

The Faina's crew (at the time of its September 25 hijacking) consisted of 17 Ukrainians, three Russians and one Latvian, including a 14-year-old boy. On September 25, Viktor Nikolsky, first mate on the Faina, said that Vladimir Kolobkov, the ship's Russian captain, had died from a hypertension-related stroke.

During the month of September, a total of 374 people of all nationalities were held by pirates off Somalia and the highest held at any one time was 339, estimates Danish security firm Risk Intelligence of Vedbaek.

The Belize-flagged Faina is carrying a cargo of Ukrainian T-72 tanks and related equipment.

Purportedly, the tanks were intended for the Government of Kenya, though this has been called into question in the Kenyan news media.

Meantime, Andrew Mwangura of the Seafarers Assistance program, the first to come forward with news that the pirates claimed to have documents showing the tanks were headed for Sudan, was arrested late on Wednesday and charged with making inflammatory statements. He was was also charged with possession of four joints of bhang (marijuana)--"a charge that elicited cynical laughter among those in court," according to the Nairobi newspaper The Nation. The reason for the laughter may relate to the fact that Mr. Mwangura's surrender to the police was arranged by another newspaper, The Standard, and he was driven to the police station by deputy director of the Kenya Human Rights Commission, Mr. Hassan Omar Hassan. His lawyer, Mr. Francis Kadima, argued, that it was unlikely that his client would bring bhang with him to a police interrogation.

The judge ruled he should be held for five days in prison while further investigations were made.

Mr. Mwangura has frequently been helpful in putting shipowners and journalists in touch with pirates. This has led to suggestions that his contacts with the pirates may be suspicious. If so, as this profile in The Scotsman indicates, he doesn't seem to be getting much from the connection.

U.S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH

Click on image to enlarge


marine log logo

FREE MARINE INDUSTRY INFORMATION

EVAC

DNV LOGO

MARINE MONEY

CLEANGULF

MASTECH