IMO ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS
Are IMO regulations tough enough to keep national governments from imposing stricter measures?

Yes--Mostly
Only partly
No--expect a slew of regional regs!

Marine Log

June 12, 2007

Shipping has short timeframe to cut emissions

"Shipping has no more than two to three years to demonstrate emission-reduction results," warns Tor E. Svensen, chief operating officer of DNV Maritime, "To be able to use this restricted timeframe effectively, the industry has to start searching for voluntary improvements now."

Svensen emphasized the need for action at a DNV press conference at Nor-Shipping.

"Society at large has sharpened its environmental focus dramatically over the past few years," he said. "Authorities and regulators have followed this up by predicting new regulations. Although transportation by ship is far more efficient and causes less emissions than the alternatives, the shipping industry will have to pay much more attention to the environment in the future than it does today."

As a class society, DNV will be able to play a key role, together with industry partners, in achieving improvements. "If we manage to work together and set voluntary targets the whole industry can be proactive and ahead of new regulations and requirements imposed by the authorities," Svensen says.

At the press conference, DNV used one example to illustrate that it is not only new technology and new research that have to be used to move forward.

Announcing that DNV is to class the world's largest ore carriers, the four 388,000 dwt ships being built for Bergesen Worldwide by Bohai shipyard, China, Svensen stated that these vessels are examples of how to reduce emissions by optimizing transportation.

By using the 388,000 dwt ships instead of standard capsize bulk carriers for the same trade, the fuel consumption per tonne carried will be reduced by almost 30 percent. Emissions to air will be reduced by a similar figure.

"It is not sustainable for the shipping industry to continue 'as is'," said Svensen. "The Kyoto Protocol and EU, for example, have stated onshore emission-reduction targets of 2030 per cent. The shipping industry has to reduce offshore emissions by at least the same amount--and most probably by more."

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