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February 3, 2010

Navy submits long range shipbuilding plan

The Navy has sent Congress its FY 2011 Annual Long Range Shipbuilding Plan. Included is an addendum report on Navy plans for decommissioning ships during Future-Years Defense Plan (FYDP).

Though it says that the "structure requirements articulated in this report are based upon the 313-ship force originally set forth in the FY 2005 Naval Force Structure Assessment," it projects a battle force level of 292 ships in the near term (FY 2016), 304 in the mid term (FY 2028) and 301 in the Far Term (FY 2040).

Among other things, the plan:

Shifts the procurement of CVNs to five-year cost centers, which will result in a steady-state aircraft carrier force of 11 CVNs throughout the 30-year period. In addition, the plan reflects a funding profile of four years of advance procurement and four years of full funding for these strategic assets.

Solidifies the DoN's long-term plans for Large Surface Combatants by truncating the DDG 1000 program, restarting the DDG 51 production line, and continuing the Advanced Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) development efforts. Over the past year, the Navy has conducted a study that concludes a DDG 51 hull form with an AMDR suite is the most cost-effective solution to fleet air and missile defense requirements over the near to mid-term.

Solidifies the DoN's long-term plans for Small Surface Combatants by announcing a down-select to a single sea frame for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program, and by splitting its production between two competing yards. This new acquisition strategy is designed to reduce the ship's overall cost.

Maintains an adaptable amphibious landing force of approximately 33 ships. Amphibious ships are proving to be one of the most flexible battle force platforms, as indicated by the high demand for both traditional Amphibious Ready Group operations and deployments of independent amphibious ships for a variety of presence, irregular warfare, maritime security, humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, and partnership building missions.

Shifts away from a single MPF(F) (Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future)) squadron optimized for high-end, forcible entry operations toward three Maritime Prepositioning Squadrons with enhanced sea basing capabilities useful across the full range of military operations. Each squadron will have one Large Medium-Speed Roll-on/Roll-off (LMSR) cargo ship (transferred from the Army), and be supported by a T-AKE and a new Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) based on existing designs for commercial ocean-going tankers.

You can see the plan HERE


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