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December 20, 2010

ST Marine books upgrade and repair orders

Singapore's ST Marine (Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd.) has secured its first contract from the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). It is to to double-hull the 157.2 m long combat logistics vesse HMAS Success, to be double hulled to meet IMO standards for environmental protection against oil spills. The conversion involves the installation of a second hull internal to the ship.

Commissioned in 1986, HMAS Success is the largest ship built in Australia for the RAN. Work at ST Marine is scheduled to commence before the end of this year when the tanker is deployed in the region and will be re-delivered by the first half of 2011.

The breakthrough order is one of several upgrading and modifications contracts recently received by ST Marine, which is a subsidiary of ST Engineering, whose U.S. operations include VT Halter Marine.

On the commercial front, ST Marine secured two significant repair and conversion jobs from Saipem (Portugal) Comercio Maritimo (Saipem) and Coastline Group of Companies (Coastline).

Saipem's 31,901 tonnes (GRT) SEMAC 1, a semi submersible pipe lay vessel measuring 188.1 m long including truss and 54.8 m wide, will undergo upgrading and modification works including: stern winches upgrade, installation of new pipe tensioners, modification of Abandonment and Recovery winch, maintenance activities and "Australization."

To work off Australia, the vessel needs to meet requirements such as having each cabin accommodate a maximum two persons and be equipped with a private toilet unit as well as ensuring that the entire vessel is asbestos free. Some of the major on SEMAC 1 will therefore include removing existing accommodations (98 cabins with galley and offices) to rebuild 168 new cabins with galley and offices, building a new helideck and an extra accommodation block. The project has commenced and is expected to be completed by end July in 2011.

Coastline's Caballo Maya, a 143.5 m long and 22 m wide offshore diving support construction vessel will be undergoing fabrication and installation of sponsons, crane foundation and modification of the stern section. The sponsons fabrication will widen the vessel and help improve its stability. The vessel will be upgraded to install an 850 ton Huisman heavy lift crane. Caballo Maya arrived at Tuas Shipyard in mid December 2010 and work has already commenced to fabricate the sponsons and stern blocks. The vessel is expected to join Coastline's fleet of deep sea offshore support vessels by the first quarter of 2011.


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